adriannadukat:

Goodbye. Basement tapes.

73 notes

crazycomet13:

The dead bodies of The Columbine High School Library

crazycomet13:

The dead bodies of The Columbine High School Library

3 notes

ericharrisblog:

a view from the new library

ericharrisblog:

a view from the new library

63 notes

ericharrisblog:

On top of a hill near Columbine High School, 15 crosses are aligned.

Two bear the names of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold.

Those two crosses drew praise as well as criticism from the steady stream of mourners paying respects.

Each of the crosses bears a name and photograph. Flowers are strewn at their bases. No one was able to say who erected the two new crosses.

On both Eric Harris’ and Dylan Klebold’s crosses, someone wrote “Hate breeds hate” and “I forgive you.”

On Klebold’s cross was also the simple question: “Why?”

A number of people stopped to read the sayings, with some adding their own.

Jean Carney, 79, of Denver wrote “May God have mercy on your soul, Sorry we all failed you” on Klebold’s cross.

"We allowed all this horrible violence on TV and the movies," he said. "The whole society failed them … . I’m glad to see they put something up for them."

Others left notes at Klebold’s cross.

One read: “For all those names unspoken and faces unseen, you will never be forgotten and your death was not in vain.”

Sharon Dunn, 45, of Littleton was glad to see Harris’ cross.

"It says a lot about this community," she said. "The community is willing to embrace these individuals. We are all affected. It’s going to affect so many people, and there isn’t a hatred held against anybody."

She said it was unusual to see this kind of tribute.

"How many other places would allow this and not have it taken out of the ground already?" she asked.

"There is a lot of love here. This is going to heal the community."

But not everyone liked the two crosses.

"I don’t think it’s right to have the killers up here with the victims," said Anna Whitcomb, 21, of Denver. "I don’t think they should be recognized. I think it does an injustice."

She wants the two crosses taken down.

"People come here to mourn and to pay respect to the innocent victims," she said. "Dylan and Eric were not the innocent."

Joe Jostes, 15, of Denver knelt before Harris’ cross and prayed.

"I just pray that he will come to God and not do stuff like that," he said.

Melissa McBryde, 29, of Denver wrote on Harris’ cross: “He is still God’s child and is loved.”

"Even though he did a horrific thing, God will forgive him," she said.

She approved of the crosses for Harris and Klebold.

"They were hurt as much as anybody else."

(Source:rockymountainsnews)

138 notes

ericharrisblog:

They’re the hills where Columbine High football players run wind sprints — the hills overlooking the gridiron and the school beyond that a generation of students has called the Rebel Hills.

In the last seven days, and particularly since someone erected 15 crosses there, new names have been suggested: Memorial Hills, Peace Hills, the Silence Violence Hills.

"Peace Hills — that would be cool," said Lynn Romero, 40, who joined about 500 Dakota Ridge High School students in a march to the Clement Park on Wednesday afternoon. Behind her she pulled her two children in a wagon. "Let’s have a little more love in the world."

Thousands visited the makeshift shrine atop the lower of the two hills Wednesday to see the heartrending, typically anonymous messages left for the living. Some come as tourists, taking snapshots, but most seem to leave something behind.

Someone who signed his name “Scott” planted 13 burr oaks on the hillside. His laminated message is that he will pray for the victims as they grow.

"The joy you must have given. Rest in peace, my sweet," is written on Rachel Scott’s cross. Nearby, on Eric Harris’s: "How can anyone forgive you?"

Families reach the summit and fall together on their knees in prayer. The ground beneath each cross is strewn with irises, carnations, lillies, daisies, teddy bears, books, poems, posters and rosaries.

"It helps me pay my respects to the ones who are gone and helps strengthen our spirit to change our society," said Nancy Summers, 49, whose grown children attended Columbine more than a decade ago.

Some visitors Wednesday were on second and third trips.

And some had motives other than consolation.

When a woman with a child in tow repeatedly wrote “evil bastard” on Dylan Klebold’s cross, Angel Reynolds and Elizabeth Montano asked her, tearfully, to consider forgiveness.

But the woman insisted on putting her message on Eric Harris’s cross. At one point, someone snatched the pen from the woman’s hand, while someone else went for police. As the disturbance drew more attention, the crowd began an impromptu Amazing Grace, and the woman and her child left.

Kathy Kehrman, 54, said she was glad to see the shooters memorialized with the 13 victims they killed. Some mourners have expressed resentment at the equal treatment.

"It’s just very peaceful," Kehrman said. "It’s not that they were missing (when only 13 crosses were erected), but adding them is good. God is a merciful God. In a way, they’re all victims."

Elsewhere in Clement Park, memorials that seemed huge three days ago are mountainous now. The fence around the tennis court is a blanket of flowers and notes.

There are funny messages intended to be serious and serious messages meant to be light-hearted. “Humans of the Planet Earth,” says one message, evidently delivered by space aliens. “Do you want to encounter other beings? First you must learn to live with your different people.”

(source:rockymountainnews)

ericharrisblog:

They’re the hills where Columbine High football players run wind sprints — the hills overlooking the gridiron and the school beyond that a generation of students has called the Rebel Hills.

In the last seven days, and particularly since someone erected 15 crosses there, new names have been suggested: Memorial Hills, Peace Hills, the Silence Violence Hills.

"Peace Hills — that would be cool," said Lynn Romero, 40, who joined about 500 Dakota Ridge High School students in a march to the Clement Park on Wednesday afternoon. Behind her she pulled her two children in a wagon. "Let’s have a little more love in the world."

Thousands visited the makeshift shrine atop the lower of the two hills Wednesday to see the heartrending, typically anonymous messages left for the living. Some come as tourists, taking snapshots, but most seem to leave something behind.

Someone who signed his name “Scott” planted 13 burr oaks on the hillside. His laminated message is that he will pray for the victims as they grow.

"The joy you must have given. Rest in peace, my sweet," is written on Rachel Scott’s cross. Nearby, on Eric Harris’s: "How can anyone forgive you?"

Families reach the summit and fall together on their knees in prayer. The ground beneath each cross is strewn with irises, carnations, lillies, daisies, teddy bears, books, poems, posters and rosaries.

"It helps me pay my respects to the ones who are gone and helps strengthen our spirit to change our society," said Nancy Summers, 49, whose grown children attended Columbine more than a decade ago.

Some visitors Wednesday were on second and third trips.

And some had motives other than consolation.

When a woman with a child in tow repeatedly wrote “evil bastard” on Dylan Klebold’s cross, Angel Reynolds and Elizabeth Montano asked her, tearfully, to consider forgiveness.

But the woman insisted on putting her message on Eric Harris’s cross. At one point, someone snatched the pen from the woman’s hand, while someone else went for police. As the disturbance drew more attention, the crowd began an impromptu Amazing Grace, and the woman and her child left.

Kathy Kehrman, 54, said she was glad to see the shooters memorialized with the 13 victims they killed. Some mourners have expressed resentment at the equal treatment.

"It’s just very peaceful," Kehrman said. "It’s not that they were missing (when only 13 crosses were erected), but adding them is good. God is a merciful God. In a way, they’re all victims."

Elsewhere in Clement Park, memorials that seemed huge three days ago are mountainous now. The fence around the tennis court is a blanket of flowers and notes.

There are funny messages intended to be serious and serious messages meant to be light-hearted. “Humans of the Planet Earth,” says one message, evidently delivered by space aliens. “Do you want to encounter other beings? First you must learn to live with your different people.”

(source:rockymountainnews)

75 notes

ericharrisblog:

empathyisvital:

Eric’s paternal grandparents, Thelma and Walter.

How the hell did you find this photo, mister detective? :)

ericharrisblog:

empathyisvital:

Eric’s paternal grandparents, Thelma and Walter.

How the hell did you find this photo, mister detective? :)

126 notes

nbkbasementtapes:

Eric Harris & Dylan Klebold
signatures and fingerprints

307 notes

ericharrisblog:

The Klebolds house, where we can see Dylan’s bedroom windows on the right, with the red shutters.

66 notes